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20121126
20121126
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
of talks. >>> a u.n. human rights expert says the japanese government should do more to protect the health of people affected by the fukushima nuclear accident. u.n. special rapporteur anand grover spent ten days in the disaster-stricken northeast. he was examining whether the health needs of people are properly met. grover criticized the japanese government for its inadequate response to the crisis, including failing to disclose enough data on the spread of radioactive substances immediately after the accident. he said decisions on decontamination and other measures did not take into account the needs of socially disadvantaged groups. grover says they include pregnant women, children, and the elderly. he added that he will urge the japanese government to improve the situation along with submitting what he found. a final report will be given to the u.n. council in june next year. >>> bank of japan governor masaaki shirakawa has defended the central bank's monetary easing policy. he says the boj has pumped some of the largest amounts of money among industrialized countries into the economy.
in some detail, the palestinians should not take this to the un in the short term and we urged them not to do that. if they do so we will have to consider the right way to vote. in an end point is this. we will not solve this problem that the united nations. this problem will be solved by israelis and palestinians sitting at the negotiating table. there may be dangers from pushing the too early in terms of a cutoff of funds for the palestinian auority and oth consequences that could follow so in the end bets get negotiations going rather than discussions at the u.n.. >> if the prime minister wants to send a clear message to scotland and england belong together shouldn't he be doing his best to make sure the principal road from london is not going to come back? >> my friend makes a very attractive bid for the statement and the chancellor is not here but i'm sure other treasury colleagues have been listening closely. >> the prime minister claims universal credit will bring about the most fundamental and radical changes. given the government's propensity for this can he guarantee that
, i'm going to delve into the darkest most toxic aspect of marriage. is that cool you?" and he said,un, "go for it. don't censor yourself." and he is my first and best reader. and he put it down and said, whooo! this is dark." >> schieffer: has he ever expressed fear? >> he sleeps like this next to me, one eye open. >> schieffer: and how about you, chris? how much of your book-- you talked about how you were the spouse at home while your wife workedes, while you were in europe. but beyond that, you get very deeply into the c.i.a. and things like that. does any of that come from personal experience? >> no, none at all. i-- most of the "the expats" is really a story about a marriage ba woman who used to be something else, who no longer is, about a marriage under the strain of this move in this part of life. that's the book i was writing for a few months. and it was a very honest and personal book. it was about the life i was living, people who surrounded me, what it's like to be an expat, what luxembourg was like. after writing that book for a couple months, still with a lot of very, ver
of billions of dollars, $600 billion in predicted holiday sales. un, only a small portion of that, maybe 20%, but much more likely somewhere around 10% will be online sales. i think some of that is really organic and new, but we don't yet have the numbers for this holiday season. you know, several people have commented today, we don't even know if this kind of momentume which is very real, very significant for this five-day holiday spree, much more than even the boom optimists predicted -- whether that will continue into the long holiday season is still ahead. >> brown: neil what, do you look at, the question of online shopping? is it its own thing? does it add to the whole? what's the impact in the larger picture? >> people are going to spend based on their incomes and jobs and paychecks. ultimately, whether that spending happens online at amazon or in a store, you know, it matters for the retail sector. it matters for all kinds of workers in that sector. but in terms of the overall economy what matters is how much people are spending. one man's spending is another man's income and getting
. jon: several republican lawmakers are toning down their criticism of u.n. ambassador susan rice and her handling of the deadly attack on the consulate in libya. ambassador rice was under fire for appearances on the television immediately after the attack where she blamed it on the youtube video. many vocal critics, like senator john mccain are turning up the heat on president obama and the state department. >> the problem is the president of the united states in a debate with mitt romney said that he had said it was a terrorist attack. he hadn't. jon: chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge is live in washington. she has more on all of this. so this shift in focus to the state department, what are we learning about that, catherine? report thank you, jon, and good morning. we may learn early as this week when secretary of state hillary clinton will testify on capitol hill about the warnings and intelligence leading up to the 9/11 attack on the consulate. on sunday talk shows leading republicans pointed to what they believe is the culpability of clinton's state departm
mahmoud abbas is expected to appear before the u.n. general assembly in a new bid for palestinian statehood. a move that despite earlier reports from abbas offices doesn't have the support of hamas leaders in gaza. what do all these events mean for lasting peace? executive committee member for the palestinian association, appreciate it. let's begin with negotiations in cairo today. what kind of progress do you expect to see? >> well, progress -- the initial step of cessation of violence has taken place. now the steps that deal with the substance and with more longer term arrangements such as lifting the siege. these steps have to take place. lifting the maritime blockade, sea blockade around gaza. leaving the territory and waters, also air space. more importantly all the crossing points by land. lifting the blockade would mean that gaza is resuming some sort of normal life again despite the israeli occupation. and that the palestinian people of gaza would begin a whole new phase. and that would be a very positive step towards not just conciliation but also peaceful negotiations. >
fascinating, his old cohort, cofounder of the plo with yasser arafat, mahmoud abbas is going to the u.n. this week to ask for nonmember -- official status for a palestinian state, and, you know, i knew arafat pretty well. i think i could honestly say that if they were to get a state, even nonmember status, unofficial, at the u.n., yasser arafat wouldn't mind being above ground for that. >> oh, boy. >> there's no other way to look at it. >> above ground. it will be -- absolutely. we're going to learn more details about that tomorrow. jim, thanks, as always, for your insights. appreciate it. >> great to be with you. >>> disturbing reminder of the ravages of war. activists in syria say a cluster bomb, this one was dropped on a playground. we're going to get a live report. [ gordon ] for some this line is a convenience. how you doing today? i'm good thanks. how are you? i'm good. [ gordon ] but for others, it's all they can afford. every day nearly nine million older americans don't have enough to eat. anything else? no, not today. join me, aarp, and aarp foundation in the drive to end hung
, should be called upon to step up and belly up to the u.n. security council. they should exert influence. day, i suggest, are the most influential at this time, and they have the ability, number one, to stop supporting this regime that is slaughtering its citizens, to stop, by its acquiescence, standing on the sidelines and letting it happen while the rest of the world realize its hands. >> how do you accomplish that? >> i think they can assert influence in syria. they are one of the few countries that really can at this point. iran, forget it. >> how? what they can support the security camera resolutions, which thus far we have been unable to achieve -- security council resolutions, which we have been unable to achieve. >> what i think we are talking about here is, where do we intervene? where do we not? what is the rationale for doing so or to not do so? i think it's got to be based on one fundamental principle -- our interests, our values, and our values are our interests. i say about because we went to bosnia and not because they were a threat to the united states of america but beca
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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